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California Communities Transformed by Regionalized Sustainable Food System

Dream type: Transformation

A future day reveals California transformed by community based economic innovations in the food system. On this day, California’s communities are connected, resilient and strong. I see a future in which our neighborhoods have a vibrant food and farm industry; we are healthy by accessing fresh affordable food; our rich diversity is expressed by preserving food heritage; our environment is free of industrial toxins; and our once disenfranchised communities are empowered to sustain their own health and beyond. Support my project Farm Food Connect in developing models, tools and incentives that enable this dream to be a reality.

by: Esperanza Pallana | Dec 16, 2010

14 people like this.


The Isles of California

Dream type: Transformation

After the catastrophic collapse of the North Atlantic Conveyor in 2011, society struggled to cope with sudden re-glaciation and seemingly instantaneous 150-foot sea level rises. Time-lapse satellite photography would show California appearing to 'sink' into the ocean, as populations sought higher ground in the coastal range, Sierras, and westward. As local communities re-formed in the hills above a new coastline, they would come to call themselves the "Water Tribes." A typical day would see vertical hydroponic farms, teams of recovery divers pulling up lost treasures, and portable osmotic desalination and power generators cobbled together by refugee engineering talent.

by: David Anderson | Nov 9, 2010

14 people like this.


Algal Bloom

Dream type: Transformation

Mayor Villaraigosa's creation of the LA Cleantech Corridorâ„¢ (2008) lay the groundwork for a restoration of the once-mighty Los Angeles River. Funded by water bonds, and powered by permaculture and synthbio, the campaign was long - with the waterway formally declared 'clean' in late 2015. 18 months after 'mission accomplished', a collosal algal mat floats beneath the East LA Interchange, filtering toxins from the water; in Paramount and East Compton, green algae provides an emerging Nutrition Commons; and further downstream, the marijuana sharecroppers of Long Beach use unlicensed channels to rerout water - irrigating their backyard plantations for free.

by: Justin Pickard | Oct 28, 2010

17 people like this.


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